Echelon’s matching colored concrete blocks feature an integrated water repellent, as does the Amerimix mortar used to install it to battle degradation from heavy downpours on a building that bakes in the sun most of the time.
Archive (Photos)

Mesa Community College Performing Arts Center Hits High Note with Exquisite Masonry Design and Enhanced

Mesa Community College (MCC) in Mesa, Ariz., serves the academic needs of nearly 26,000 students by offering more than 200 degrees and certificates in everything from biotechnology, computer science, and dental hygiene to mortuary science and urban horticulture. However, it was a re-dedication to music and the arts that gave birth to a new Performing Arts Center, acoustically fine-tuned with an inner and outer shell of sound-reflective masonry.

Read the full article…

…[READ MORE]

Archive (Photos)

Project Spotlight: The ‘Hospital of the Future’

After a decade of planning and roughly three years of construction, a hospital consisting of 118,000 square feet of thin stone, 5,400 tons of steel, 19,700 yards of concrete, and 18 million feet of cable opened its state-of-the-art doors. Virtua Voorhees, “The Hospital of the Future” as it is known, is situated on 125 acres in Voorhees, a New Jersey suburb within the greater Philadelphia metropolitan area.

Read the full article…

…[READ MORE]

Masonry Design Magazine
Archive (Photos)

Boston’s Liberty Hotel

Balancing preservation with modern functionality is not an easy job for any restoration project, but when converting a 19th century prison into a 21st century, luxury hotel, the situation is unusual if not unprecedented. In 2002, a design and construction team led by Cambridge Seven Associates began a five-year process to restore the defunct Charles Street Jail in Boston.

Read the full article…

…[READ MORE]

Masonry Design Magazine
Columns & Departments

NovDec 2008: Minimizing Masonry Litigation – Part 6: Fences and Walls

Masonry often can be the best choice for fences, freestanding walls, or for walls that retain earth. But if not designed and constructed correctly, masonry (or other) fences and walls can crack, fail, injure or kill, and cause lawsuits. The author’s cases demonstrate repeatedly that all of this bad news would not have occurred if there had been compliance with the building code.

Read the full article…

…[READ MORE]