Masonry Design Magazine
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Baltimore Clayworks

Housed in a historic, former Carnegie library, in the Mt. Washington neighborhood of Baltimore, the Baltimore Clayworks is a non-profit (501c3) ceramic arts center founded in 1978 by artists who sought to establish a hub for anyone wishing to learn about or experience the fine art of clay. The group’s primary mission is to “develop, sustain and promote an artist-centered community that provides outstanding educational, artistic and collaborative programs in the ceramic arts.” In 2000, a secondary mission was to renovate (and bring up to code) the aging building, while maintaining as much of its original design and materials as possible, and doing so with the Clayworks kilns still firing.

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Masonry Design Magazine
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Award-Winning Hardscape Design

Since 1989, the Brick Industry Association’s Brick In Architecture Awards have been one of the country’s most prestigious design competitions featuring clay brick. This article focuses on several projects that won awards in the Paving & Landscape Architecture Design Category in 2008.

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Masonry Design Magazine
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Old College, New Brick

The University of Georgia’s (UGA) campus in Athens, Ga., is widely regarded as one of the most picturesque in the nation, with its tree-lined walkways; ample green space; and historic, diverse architecture. The best examples of this entire splendor can be seen in the area known as North Campus, which is the property where the university’s first buildings were constructed. The school, chartered in 1785, takes very good care of its grounds and infrastructure, always with an eye toward historic preservation and architectural significance. In fact, in 2006 the university celebrated the bicentennial of the opening of its first building, Old College, for which it had spent the previous two years renovating. This is the story of that renovation.

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Masonry Design Magazine
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Getting the Air Out

With the seemingly constant changes to lift heights and required consolidation in the codes, there seems to be some confusion out there as to the what, when, where, how and why concerning the consolidation of grouted masonry cells. This article will help to demystify masonry grout and vibration products, and their usage.

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Masonry Design Magazine
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As Cast Stone Prices Fall, Will Quality Suffer?

A concrete idea is considered a reliable thought just as the phrase “cast in concrete” is an expression denoting permanency. The material from which these expressions are derived and that is used to build your reputation can only live up to its quotable status if its mix design contains an elusive element of the human moral code … conscience

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Masonry Design Magazine
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Understanding Air and Vapor Barriers

With moisture-related problems in both new construction and older buildings equally prevalent in the news, there is no doubt that air and vapor barriers should be a well used and understood tool in a designer’s bag of tricks. However, depending on a number of factors – such as the climate of the given location, the building materials used in the project, building codes, and other key design issues – the type of barrier and the appropriate location within the system’s structure vary greatly.

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Lighthouse Restoration

In 1835, when the Pemaquid Point lighthouse was built in Bristol, Maine, the American paint industry did not yet exist. Portland cement technology was still more than three decades away from reaching the United States, and prepackaged paint production would start even later. Yet the stone lighthouse, built utilizing the best technology of its time, endured severe coastal exposures for 172 years with only minimal maintenance.

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Masonry Design Magazine
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The British Library at St. Pancras

Although it may have taken three decades to complete – courtesy of construction delays and political wrangling – the British Library at St. Pancras (BL) is recognized and appreciated now for its sheer size and brick detailing. Built between 1962 and 1997, the BL is the second-largest library in the world – more than 1.2 million square feet of space with more than 25 million books – and one of the largest public buildings in Europe.

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Pontificial Lateran University

In 2003, a team led by King Roselli Architetti (an English/Italian partnership that quickly was establishing a name for itself) embarked on a challenging, three-year project to expand a university library within The Vatican while adhering to considerable site constraints such as a narrow building corridor and an underground vault full of priceless antiques, artifacts and books. The determined team of international professionals didn’t flinch; instead, they used the constricted job site to their advantage, creating a unique, brick-clad building that is modern in design but timeless in its efficacy.

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Masonry Design Magazine
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Beauty That Endures

Americans have used clay brick pavers on pedestrian pathways and roadways since early Colonial days, because genuine clay pavers add stature, character and long-term appeal. Can you imagine what Georgetown, Old Town Alexandria, Va., and Boston’s Beacon Hill would look like now, had the sidewalks been paved (or repaved) in a material other than genuine clay pavers?

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