Masonry Design Magazine
Archive (Photos)

The Teamwork Behind Green Design

When it comes to sustainable design, old is new again. While green building is touted as the most modern of trends, its integrated approach is similar to the classic tradition of a “master builder,” who was able to provide a design solution rich with multi-disciplinary expertise.

Read the full article…

…[READ MORE]

Masonry Design Magazine
Archive (Photos)

Award-Winning Hardscape Design

Since 1989, the Brick Industry Association’s Brick In Architecture Awards have been one of the country’s most prestigious design competitions featuring clay brick. This article focuses on several projects that won awards in the Paving & Landscape Architecture Design Category in 2008.

Read the full article…

…[READ MORE]

Masonry Design Magazine
Archive (Photos)

Mason Contractor Certification

When the Mason Contractors Association of America (MCAA) considered the idea of certifying mason contractors, there were many who were very skeptical of the idea. However, after careful thought and consideration, the Board decided that not only was certification the correct move for the industry, but without it, the industry would irresponsibly be ignoring the needs of our consumers.

Read the full article…

…[READ MORE]

Masonry Design Magazine
Archive (Photos)

Chateaux on Central

Phoenix, Ariz., is among the nation’s fastest growing cities. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the city’s population has grown about 3 percent (now at more than 1.5 million) since 2000. The Bureau also reports that Phoenix, which a century ago was not even among the 100 most populous cities in the country, has passed Philadelphia in total population to become the fifth biggest American city.

Read the full article…

…[READ MORE]

m
Archive (Photos)

Green Building Is Big Business

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reports that up to 48 percent of the greenhouse gas emissions contributing to global climate change are a result of building construction and maintenance projects. That’s a much larger percentage than most Americans believe. According to a recent survey conducted by the American Institute of Architects (AIA), 40 percent of Americans blame auto emissions for global warming, while only 7 percent attribute the causes to the built environment.

Read the full article…

…[READ MORE]